Doppler Andante And Rondo Program Notes

воскресенье 04 ноябряadmin
Doppler Andante And Rondo Program Notes Rating: 6,0/10 5816 reviews
By 1829, when Gioachino Rossini (1792-1868) retired after the premiere of his 39th opera, Guillaume Tell, he had become the most popular composer in the history of music for the stage, so it is no mystery why the virtuoso flutist and composer (Albert) Franz Doppler (1821-1883) would want to include a RondoPotpourri on Rossini's 'The Barber of Seville' among the various arrangements of opera tunes for two flutes he wrote for concert performances with his younger brother, Karl Doppler (1825-1900). Born in Lemberg, Poland (the present-day Lvov, Ukraine), the brothers gained fame touring Europe with their flute duo recitals, and both became prominent members of Hungarian orchestras. Karl eventually settled down as the Kapellmeister in Stuttgart (Germany), while Franz moved to Austria as conductor of the Vienna Court Opera. Franz was celebrated as a composer especially for his popular ballets, but today he is most remembered for his works that feature the flute.

Doppler, his younger brother, Karl, and Ferenc Erkel were all involved in establishing the first Hungarian symphony orchestra. Doppler is most famous for his works for flute, including Fantaisie pastorale hongroise and Andante et Rondo. Andante et Rondo, composed. He and his younger brother frequently performed flute duets of his composition and it is likely the Andante and Rondo were composed for such a performance. Lyrical and lushly romantic, the piece was a perfect way to demonstrate how music changed in the 19th century. Kruti dev 21 hindi font. Doppler was also known as a composer of operas and ballets.

Early in their careers, the touring brothers apparently were quite the picture when they performed: the left-handed Karl held his flute 'backwards' as it were, creating a mirror image of his right-handed brother as he stood opposite him. The flute duets they played were usually written or adapted by the elder Franz, but the two brothers collaborated in preparing the Rigoletto-Fantaisie, Op. 38, drawing on tunes from the ever-popular Rigoletto (1851), by Italy's foremost opera composer, Giuseppe Verdi (1813–1901). Based on Victor Hugo’s tragic play, Le roi s’amuse (1832), Verdi's title character is the spiteful court jester to the Duke of Mantua. The Duke routinely seduces the wives and daughters of his courtiers, and Rigoletto takes great pleasure in mocking and humiliating the wronged noblemen. But when one of them hurls a father’s curse at Rigoletto, the superstitious jester is horrified--and, as it turns out, with good cause.
--------------------------------------------
Virtuoso flutist and composer (Albert) Franz Doppler (1821-1883) arranged and composed much music for two flutes specifically to play with his younger brother, Karl Doppler (1825-1900). Born in Lemberg, Poland (the present-day Lvov, Ukraine), the brothers gained fame touring Europe with their flute duo recitals, and both became prominent members of Hungarian orchestras. Karl eventually settled down as the Kapellmeister in Stuttgart (Germany), while Franz moved to Austria as conductor of the Vienna Court Opera. Early in their careers, the touring brothers apparently were quite the picture when they performed: the left-handed Karl held his flute 'backwards' as it were, creating a mirror image of his right-handed brother as he stood opposite him. Franz was celebrated as a composer especially for his popular ballets, but today he is most remembered for his works that feature the flute. His often-recorded Andante and Rondo for Two Flutes and Piano, Op. 25 remains a favorite not only of flutists, but has been arranged for other combinations of soloists and also with orchestral accompaniment. The lyrical Andante (in A major) has a lively middle section (in A Minor). The concluding Rondo (so-called, but not your typical rondo), alternates an sprightly, elfin tune (in A minor) reminiscent of Mendelssohn with a more lyrical one, but finishes with a variation (in C major) without the usual return to the opening key center.