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Post subject: [Help] Changing the screen resolution in Windows 3.1 Posted: Sun Oct 05, 2014 3:55 am


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Just installed a new VM with Win 3.1 off the FTP using MS-DOS 6. However, I can't seem to be able to change the screen resolution on DOS or 3.1. Does anyone know how to do this?
Thanks!

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Post subject: Re: [Help] Changing the screen resolution in Windows 3.1 Posted: Sun Oct 05, 2014 4:01 am


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What was the VM program you used to install Windows 3.1?
Sorry for double posting, and no thanks to my spotty internet connection.

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Windows 3.1 can still be installed from these images, it will just require more disk juggling. When you get a 'Can't read file' error, you'll usually swap in the next numbered disk and hit enter. Sometimes you'll have to go to the previous disk instead. I'll make a note of it on the /msdos page as well. An Open Source DOS emulator to run old DOS games. Is to run old DOS games on platforms which don't have DOS (Windows 7, 8. You'll create a character from 1 of 18 different classes that all have. RetroArch is a frontend for emulators, game engines and media players. Map creator gta sa. Some styles failed to load.

The crystal that you buy will have specification in its datasheet of what value capacitors to use. How to load program for at89c51 controller download. Whoever designed that circuit found the crystal they liked, read the crystal datasheet, saw that the crystal needs 22 pF capacitors and put those capacitors into the schematic.This is actually interesting choice of microcontroller.

Post subject: Re: [Help] Changing the screen resolution in Windows 3.1 Posted: Sun Oct 05, 2014 4:30 am


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What was the VM program you used to install Windows 3.1?
Sorry for double posting, and no thanks to my spotty internet connection.

Virtualbox for Mac, the latest version as of now.
Also while I'm at it it there any way to access the internet in windows 3.1? Please note that the only way i can transfer files between my machine and the VM is a virtual 3.5' floppy image
And you didn't double post, you're cool

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Post subject: Re: [Help] Changing the screen resolution in Windows 3.1 Posted: Sun Oct 05, 2014 4:42 am


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Hmm.. I don't use Virtualbox. (then again, I've never used OS X past 10.5.8) However, there are a couple of guides that show you how to access the internet in Virtualbox.
Part 1 (for DOS): https://forums.virtualbox.org/viewtopic.php?t=845
Part 2 (for Windows 3.1): https://forums.virtualbox.org/viewtopic.php?t=859
About the display driver, tough luck, you can only get 800x600x16 in Virtualbox. To change to it from the 640x480x16 default, use Windows Setup.

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Post subject: Re: [Help] Changing the screen resolution in Windows 3.1 Posted: Sun Oct 05, 2014 8:10 am


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You can run Windows 3.1 in MSVPC and install the SVGA driver for higher resolutions..

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Post subject: Re: [Help] Changing the screen resolution in Windows 3.1 Posted: Sun Oct 05, 2014 2:10 pm


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Or just install a vm extension for your virtual machine like virtualbox additions or something like that.

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Last edited by Archenemy on Fri Dec 13, 2013 12:00 am, edited 6634564737338 times in total.


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Post subject: Re: [Help] Changing the screen resolution in Windows 3.1 Posted: Sun Oct 05, 2014 3:18 pm


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Or just install a vm extension for your virtual machine like virtualbox additions or something like that.

That wouldn't work. VirtualBox , VMware(not sure as to which version did they stop supporting) , and Microsoft VirtualPC(except 2004 and below) do not have a VM additions for Windows 3.1


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Post subject: Re: [Help] Changing the screen resolution in Windows 3.1 Posted: Sun Oct 05, 2014 3:51 pm


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Or just install a vm extension for your virtual machine like virtualbox additions or something like that.

That wouldn't work. VirtualBox , VMware(not sure as to which version did they stop supporting) , and Microsoft VirtualPC(except 2004 and below) do not have a VM additions for Windows 3.1

You can download the earliest vm extension of the virtual machine.

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Last edited by Archenemy on Fri Dec 13, 2013 12:00 am, edited 6634564737338 times in total.


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Post subject: Re: [Help] Changing the screen resolution in Windows 3.1 Posted: Sun Oct 05, 2014 3:56 pm


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For Windows 3.1 in Virtual PC, you don't need VM Additions (the VM Additions for Windows 3.1 never contained a graphics driver anyway). All you need is any S3 Trio64 drivers you can find online. Install them, and then choose 1204x768x16 M (= 16 million) colors, and voilà, you have a higher resolution and a higher colore depth.

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Post subject: Re: [Help] Changing the screen resolution in Windows 3.1 Posted: Sun Oct 05, 2014 8:57 pm


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Windows 3.1 runs pretty well under DosBox, of all programs. I was even able to achieve 1024x768 resolution, 256 colors. Just remember to find a fake SHARE.EXE if you want to run some (not necessarily networking) programs like Office.


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Post subject: Re: [Help] Changing the screen resolution in Windows 3.1 Posted: Sun Oct 05, 2014 9:47 pm


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Post subject: Re: [Help] Changing the screen resolution in Windows 3.1 Posted: Wed Oct 08, 2014 6:43 pm


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There is a patched version of the Generic SVGA driver that will get you up to 1024X768X256 in Windows 3.1(.1/WfW) in Virtualbox. It may be available on the FTP site here -- if not google japheth Windows 3.1 VESA. The only issue I've run across with this driver is that the video gets corrupted when you exit from a full screen DOS session.
Virtualbox doesn't emulate any specific chipset (e.g. S3, Cirrus) but rather uses it's own custom VESA compatible video adapter, which means that most DOS apps that support 'Generic VESA' work fine (I've actually had better luck with VirtualBox for legacy OS's than with VMWare). You don't need UnivBE or similar as all of this is already in the BIOS.

Last edited by Warp45 on Tue Oct 14, 2014 2:51 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Post subject: Re: [Help] Changing the screen resolution in Windows 3.1 Posted: Thu Oct 09, 2014 11:26 am


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Virtualbox doesn't emulate any specific chipset (e.g. S3, Cirrus) but rather uses it's own custom VESA compatible video adapter,

You're correct in that it doesn't emulate a real chipset, but VirtualBox's graphic adapter is derived from the one in Bochs, known as the 'Bochs Graphics Adaptor' (BGA). There's some fairly decent documentation available and a driver does exist for all NT-based versions of Windows up to Windows 7.
Of course, 16-bit Windows has a completely different driver model, so building a driver for Windows 3.x would take a fair amount of work. The source code to a number of Windows display drivers (multiple drivers can be built from the same source, via build options) was included in the Windows 3.1 DDK, which would provide a reasonable starting point.


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Post subject: Re: [Help] Changing the screen resolution in Windows 3.1 Posted: Tue Oct 14, 2014 2:49 am


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Thanks for the clarification on Virtualbox's graphics adapter. If one were to go to the trouble of writing a 3.1 driver though, would there be any performance advantages in writing a 'native' BGA driver over a generic VESA one? If not, the latter would seem to be a better target as it would run on any VESA capable graphics card (e.g. like the Scitech Drivers/GRADD drivers for OS/2, which seem to offer very decent performance in pure VESA mode in Virtualbox).


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Win3mu, allows 16-bit Windows programs to be ran on 64-bit Windows OSes. It is an open source WIP project (so, many things are yet to be implemented), but it might be dead. This is incredible useful for Windows apps made for Windows versions before Windows for Workgroups 3.11 (the first 32-bit Windows OS [I believe it still ran ontop of MS-DOS or compatible Operating Systems {stuff like FreeDOS, Windows 9x's version of DOS, OS/2, or PC-DOS}]). To use Win3mu, just right click on a 16-bit Windows program and choose 'Convert with Win3emu'. A new .exe should be made (with the old .exe being renamed to .exe16), provided something didn't go wrong (again many things have yet to be implemented at this point). Just run the new .exe file to run the 16-bit software.
Link to a Github fork of Win3mu:
https://github.com/Mwyann/win3mu
Some 16-bit Windows and DOS programs also have program specific hacks, engine remakes, or ports for 32-bit or 64-bit Windows. Since these are specific to the software, the methods very depending on what your using. Because of this I won't be listing anything specific.
Links to program specific hacks, engine remakes, and ports:
I'm not listing anything due to the vast amounts that of stuff that exists.
DOSBox is a DOS emulator which allows DOS games and applications to run on modern hardware and OSes (and if you have access to the files, you can install Windows 1.0 to Windows ME [Windows ME is only partially functional], any version of MS-DOS, FreeDOS, PC-DOS, most versions of OS/2, and pretty much any DOS made for a x86 OS in DOSBox). You can either have DOSBox use a folder as a C drive and run games directly through DOSBox, or you could use a DOSBox frontend, such as D-fender Reloaded. Running through DOSBox alone should work pretty much like if you were using DOS back in the day. D-fender Reloaded adds a GUI, which makes doing these thing much easier. If the software in question exists a folder/binary (without a installer needed to run), you just add the folder/binary. Should the software need to be installed first, there are several ways you can run the installation files. Either way, once you get the software running, it will work just like it would on DOS.
Link to DOSBox:
https://www.dosbox.com/
Link to D-fender Reloaded:
http://dfendreloaded.sourceforge.net/
32-bit Windows also have a NTVDM (NT Virtual DOS Machine) built in, which can run 16-bit Windows and MS-DOS applications (although I hear modern Windows OSes, might have limitations on what kinds of software it allows to run). Windows typically will run the programs fine (in the case of Windows 10, you must first activate the NTVDM feature).
Link:
Not needed (included with 32-bit Windows).
Running a Virtual Machine, such as VirtualBox, will allow you to emulate hardware to run both old OSes and Modern OSes (provided you have access to the files for installation), such as Windows 98/98SE, Windows 95, Windows XP, MS-DOS, FreeDOS, Windows 3.1 (ontop of DOS), PC-DOS, OS/2, eCS, and ArcaOS. Basically, you run and install OSes how you would on real hardware, but in an emulated environment.
Link to VirtualBox:
https://www.virtualbox.org/
Link to FreeDOS:
http://freedos.org
A generic 32-bit InstallShield 3 installer exists that will run 16-bit installers as 32-bit applications, which is useful for 32-bit applications which use a 16-bit installer. Just add the generic 32-bit InstallShield 3 to the installation media folder, and run this in the place of the normal installer.
Link to Generic InstallShield 3 Installer:
https://www.reactos.org/forum/viewtopic.php?p=90351
Another option would be to buy and install one of the successors to OS/2 (eComStation [eCS] and ArcaOS) on a different partition to your Windows installation. You would than just have to reboot your computer onto eComStation or ArcaOS when you need to run a 16-bit Windows or DOS application. You could also use a Virtual Machine, as mentioned earlier. I have not tried this, so I can not give you much information on the subject. Some of the information here is made on assumptions, due to not owning either of these OSes.
Link to eComStation:
Installhttps://www.ecomstation.com/
Link to eComStation Demo CD:
http://www.ecomstation.com/demo.phtml
Link to ArcaOS:
https://www.arcanoae.com/
You can also install FreeDOS or MS-DOS onto a bootable thumb drive and boot into DOS when need that way (a few downsides to this method is that many utilities are not going to be present by default. Modern [x86 and x64] hardware can technically support booting into DOS this way [at least in legacy bios mode], but may feature graphical glitches or errors. Also, most modern computers don't support audio this way [although a modern laptop does support PC speaker audio through it's built-in speakers this way]). Rufus is probably the easiest way to do this.
Link to Rufus:
https://rufus.ie/
ReactOS has a very good built-in NTVDM, but it is missing some features. Also it only supports DOS applications (no OS/2 or Windows support). It also apparently doesn't have anyone currently working on it, although the missing DOS features will presumable be added by ReactOS version 1.0.0, I guess. ReactOS's NTVDM can install 16-bit Windows and DOS (probably OS/2 as well) on virtual hard drive images, but you need access to the installation files, which are still copyrighted, and Microsoft (and IBM) hasn't released them as freeware with the exception of MS-DOS (there is a free demo CD of eCS available) (Microsoft made source available for MS-DOS for very early versions of it under a very limited license, and the MS-DOS 6.22 installation files could be copied to floppies on Windows versions as late as Windows 7 [I'm not sure about Windows 8, Windows 8.1, or Windows 10 {I personally haven't looked into it since I owned a Windows 7 laptop}]). You can also, use ReactOS's NTVDM to boot and install FreeDOS onto a virtual hard drive image.
Link to ReactOS:
Not needed, it is this site.
Hopefully, someone might find some of these useful, and maybe the ReactOS Development Team might see something of value here that they didn't already know about (mainly Win3mu, for those who didn't already see previous posts which may have referenced it).
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
As a bonus, I thought I'd list a way to run Microsoft BASIC in modern Windows (as in the programming language built into almost every 8-bit computer, not the later versions that came out for DOS and Windows).
Commodore BASIC is really just a rebranded Microsoft Basic (in fact, the Commodore PET's version of BASIC was actually called Microsoft Basic, and featured an Easter Egg Microsoft included). The Commodore 8-bit line was based on evolution rather than revolution, so many features evolved from the PET and even the earlier MOS Kim-1 (Commodore owned MOS, and the PET was pretty much based on a MOS Kim-1 connected to a dumb terminal [something early Kim-1 users figured out they could do]). So, this evolutionary design applies not only to the chips (graphics, audio, CPU, etc.) and the Commodore Kernal (Commodore's official name for their 8-bit OS), but BASIC as well. With the Commodore PET's BASIC pretty much being a direct port of Microsoft's BASIC, and the Commodore 128's BASIC having many additions added.
With this information in mind, the easiest way to run the 8-bit Microsoft BASIC on modern Windows would be through Vice, a Commodore 8-bit emulator. This allows you to run Commodore 8-bit software and stuff, but for the purpose here, we would just want to use Commodore BASIC to run generic BASIC type in programs (often found in books, magazines, and online [these days]). There are several books and magazines from back in the day that gave you generic BASIC programs (often games) which didn't contain machine specific commands (stuff like non-text graphics and audio were not possible with this method, but it did allow for cross platform code).
Link to Vice:
http://vice-emu.sourceforge.net/