Massive Couldn T Find Resource Files

воскресенье 01 сентябряadmin
Massive Couldn T Find Resource Files Rating: 10,0/10 6139 reviews

So I've reinstalled everything for Massive, and every other VST works just fine. How come Massive wont work? Is there a fix for this? I am trying to use rmarkdown, within Rstudio (0.98.953) on a PC, for the first time. I have upgraded to the latest versions of R (3.1.1) and R studio. The output from sessionInfo is provided at t.

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An Azure Batch task often requires some form of data to process. Resource files are the means to provide this data to your Batch virtual machine (VM) via a task. All types of tasks support resource files: tasks, start tasks, job preparation tasks, job release tasks, etc. This article covers a few common methods on how to create resource files and place them on a VM.

Resource files are a mechanism to put data onto a VM in Batch, but the type of data and how it's used is flexible. There are, however, some common use cases:

  1. Provision common files on each VM using resource files on a start task
  2. Provision input data to be processed by tasks

Common files could be, for example, files on a start task used to install applications that your tasks run. Input data could be raw image or video data, or any information to be processed by Batch.

Types of resource files

There are a few different options available to generate resource files. The creation process for resource files varies depending on where the original data is stored.

Options for creating a resource file:

  • Storage container URL: Generates a resource file from any storage container in Azure
  • Storage container name: Generates a resource file from the name of a container in an Azure storage account linked to Batch
  • Web endpoint: Generates a resource file from any valid HTTP URL

Storage container URL

Using a storage container URL means you can access files in any storage container in Azure with the correct permissions.

In this C# example, the files have already been uploaded to an Azure storage container as blob storage. To access the data needed to create a resource file, we first need to get access to the storage container.

Create a shared access signature (SAS) URI with the correct permissions to access the storage container. Set the expiration time and permissions for the SAS. In this case, no start time is specified, so the SAS becomes valid immediately and expires two hours after it's generated.

Note

For container access, you must have both Read and List permissions, whereas with blob access, you only need Read permission.

Once the permissions are configured, create the SAS token and format the SAS URL for access to the storage container. Using the formatted SAS URL for the storage container, generate a resource file with FromStorageContainerUrl.

An alternative to generating a SAS URL is to enable anonymous, public read access to a container and its blobs in Azure Blob storage. By doing so, you can grant read-only access to these resources without sharing your account key, and without requiring a SAS. Public read access is typically used for scenarios where you want certain blobs to always be available for anonymous read access. If this scenario suits your solution, see the Anonymous access to blobs article to learn more about managing access to your blob data.

Storage container name

Instead of configuring and creating a SAS URL, you can use the name of your Azure storage container to access your blob data. The storage container used needs to in the Azure storage account that's linked to your Batch account, known as the autostorage account. Using the storage container name of an autostorage account allows you to bypass configuring and creating a SAS URL to access a storage container.

In this example, we assume that the data to be used for resource file creation is already in an Azure Storage account linked to your Batch account. If you don't have an autostorage account, see the steps in Create a Batch account for details on how to create and link an account.

By using a linked storage account, you don't need to create and configure a SAS URL to a storage container. Instead, provide the name of the storage container in your linked storage account.

Web endpoint

Data that isn't uploaded to Azure Storage can still be used to create resource files. You can specify any valid HTTP URL containing your input data. The URL is provided to the Batch API, and then the data is used to create a resource file.

In the following C# example, the input data is hosted on fictitious GitHub endpoint. The API retrieves the file from the valid web endpoint and generates a resource file to be consumed by your task. No credentials are needed for this scenario.

Tips and suggestions

Each Azure Batch task uses files differently, which is why Batch has options available for managing files on tasks. The following scenarios aren't meant to be comprehensive, but instead cover a few common situations and provide recommendations.

Many resource files

Your Batch job may contain several tasks that all use the same, common files. If common task files are shared among many tasks, using an application package to contain the files instead of using resource files may be a better option. Application packages provide optimization for download speed. Also, data in application packages is cached between tasks, so if your task files don't change often, application packages may be a good fit for your solution. With application packages, you don't need to manually manage several resource files or generate SAS URLs to access the files in Azure Storage. Batch works in the background with Azure Storage to store and deploy application packages to compute nodes.

If each task has many files unique to that task, resource files are mostly likely the best option. Tasks that use unique files often need to be updated or replaced, which is not as easy to do with application packages content. Resource files provide additional flexibility for updating, adding, or editing individual files.

Number of resource files per task

If there are several hundred resource files specified on a task, Batch might reject the task for it being too large. It's best to keep your tasks small by minimizing the number of resource files on the task itself.

If there's no way to minimize the number of files your task needs, you can optimize the task by creating a single resource file that references a storage container of resource files. To do this, put your resource files into an Azure Storage container and use the different “Container” modes of resource files. Use the blob prefix options to specify collections of files to be downloaded for your tasks.

Next steps

  • Learn about application packages as an alternative to resource files.
  • For more information about using containers for resource files, see Container workloads.
  • To learn how to gather and save the output data from your tasks, see Persist job and task output.
  • Learn about the Batch APIs and tools available for building Batch solutions.

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Comments

commented Sep 27, 2018

Description

Whenever I enable includeAndroidResource in my build.gradle file, manifest files can't be found on release or any non-debug buildtypes(It's ok with debug build).

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Steps to Reproduce

Add includeAndroidResources to the app module:

Create a new test class and add a custom manfiest with @Config annotation

Run test[Buildtype]UnitTest gradle task(e.g. testBetaUnitTest or testReleaseUnitTest).

The below exception will be thrown:

Robolectric & Android Version

  • Android studio 3.2 with API 28
  • Robolectric 4.0-alpha-3

commented Sep 27, 2018

It can be solved by changing src/main/AndroidManifest.xml to AndroidManifest.xml, but I don't know why src/main/AndroidManifest.xml works in debug mode.

commented Oct 31, 2018

You shouldn't need to specify a manifest in your @config() anymore. Gradle passes the location of the merged manifest.

Also, try adding

which should switch you over to binary resource mode, test startup time should be a lot faster and resource handling is a lot more faithful to real Android.

closed this Oct 31, 2018

commented Dec 24, 2018

Massive couldn

If I want some other manifest for test ?

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