The Acadia Summer Arts Program

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Our liberal arts curriculum, combined with the intangible Acadia spirit and sense of belonging, lays a strong foundation for our students’ future aspirations – travel, post-graduate study, careers, and family. Kaho na pyar he. An Acadia education helps our students grow and prepares them for life. The founder of the Acadia Summer Arts Program, Marion Boulton Stroud, asked Robert Venturi, Denise Scott Brown and Steven Izenour to design and construct houses and other structures for the camp. The architects took as inspiration Maine's indigenous architecture, such.

Born1976
Brooklyn, New YorkU.S.
NationalityAmerican
OccupationVisual artist
WebsiteKambuiOlujimi.com

Kambui Olujimi (born 1976) is a New York-based visual artist working across disciplines using installation, photography, performance, tapestry, works on paper, video, large sculptures and painting.[1] His artwork reflects on public discourse, mythology, historical narrative, social practices, exchange, mediated cultures, resilience and autonomy.[2][3]

Early life and education[edit]

Olujimi was born and grew up in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn in New York City.[4]

In 1996, he attended Bard College. In 2002, he received a BFA from Parsons School of Design. He attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in Maine in 2006. In 2013, Olujimi received an MFA from Columbia University School of the Arts.[5]

Career[edit]

Reviews of his work have appeared in publications including Art in America, The New York Times, The New Yorker, Modern Painters, Artforum, Hyperallergic,[6] and The Brooklyn Rail.[7] Throughout his career he has received numerous grants and fellowships including from A Blade of Grass,[8] the Jerome Foundation, and the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown.[9] He has also collaborated with interdisciplinary artist Coco Fusco.[10][11]

Olujimi's visual work is in the permanent collections of the Brooklyn Museum of Art[12] and the Cleveland Art Museum.[13]

Olujimi has been connected with the Catharine Clark Gallery since 2010.[14]

He teaches in the Visual Art programs at Columbia University and Cooper Union.[15][16]

Olujimi was one of the subjects of the short feature Through a Lens Darkly, concerning the struggle for African American photographers to receive recognition.[17]

Personal life[edit]

Some of Olujimi's work is inspired by Bed-Stuy community leader and activist Catherine Arline, a woman he considered a surrogate mother and referred to as his guardian angel.[18]

Olujimi currently lives and works in Brooklyn.

Honors[edit]

Artist-in-residency
  • 2005: BCAT / Rotunda Gallery Multimedia Artist Residency (New York, NY)
  • 2006: Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture (Skowhegan, ME)
  • 2007-2009: Apexart: Outbound Residency to Kellerberin, Australia (Kellerberin, Australia)
  • 2007-2009: Fine Arts Work Center at Provincetown (Provincetown, MA), 2nd Year Fellow
  • 2009: Santa Fe Art Institute (Santa Fe, NM)[9]
  • 2009: Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts (Omaha, NE)
  • 2010: Acadia Summer Arts Program, (Mt. Desert, ME)
  • 2011: The Center for Book Arts (New York, NY)
  • 2013: Tropical Lab 7 (Singapore)
  • 2014: Franconia Sculpture Park (Franconia, MN)
  • 2015: Civitella Ranieri (Umbertide, Italy)[19]
  • 2015: Meet Factory (Prague, Czech Republic)
  • 2015: The Lower Manhattan Cultural Council (LMCC) (New York, NY), Process Space Residency[20]
  • 2015: The Fountainhead Residency (Miami, FL)
  • 2016: Queenspace Residency (Long Island City, NY)
  • 2017: Robert Rauschenberg Residency (Captiva, FL)
  • 2018: MacDowell Colony (Peterborough, NH)[21]
  • 2019: Black Rock Senegal (Dakar, Senegal)[22]

Exhibitions[edit]

Olujimi's work has been exhibited in a number of institutions nationally and internationally: CUE Arts Foundation (New York, NY), MIT List Visual Arts Center (Cambridge, MA),[23] Apexart (New York, NY), Art in General (Brooklyn, NY), The Sundance Film Festival (Park City, UT), Smithsonian Institution, (Washington D.C.), Madison Museum of Contemporary Art (Madison, WI), Museum of Contemporary Art Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA), Museum of Modern Art (New York, NY), Studio Museum in Harlem (New York, NY) and Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (San Francisco, CA), Museo Nacional Reina Sofia (Madrid, Spain), Kiasma (Helsinki, Finland), Para Site (Hong Kong, China), The Jim Thompson Art Center (Bangkok, Thailand), Contemporary Arts Museum Houston (Houston, TX), The Blanton Museum of Art (Austin, TX),[24][25] The Newark Museum *(Newark, NJ),[26][27] and the Brooklyn Museum (Brooklyn, NY).[7] He has given artist lectures in many institutions nationally and internationally, including Carleton University, Ottawa,[28] University of Buffalo,[29] Rhode Island School of Design.[30]

Works and publications[edit]

  • Olujimi, Kambui (March 1998). 'No Regrets No Redemption'. The American Poetry Review. 27 (2): 42–43. ISSN0360-3709. JSTOR27782650. OCLC5542854838.
  • Olujimi, Kambui (2003). Off the Record (OTR). Brooklyn, NY: The Skylight Gallery at Restoration Plaza. OCLC758496035.
  • Olujimi, Kambui (2007). The Lost River's Dreamers Index by Dr. Keller. Hartford, CT: Real Art Ways. OCLC427270355.
  • Olujimi, Kambui; Hickey, Andria; Myers, Christopher (2010). Wayward North. New York: Art in General. ISBN978-1-934-89028-8. OCLC829395760.
  • Olujimi, Kambui. Zulu Time; essays by Sampada Aranke, Gregory Volk, and Leah Kolb. Madison, WI: Madison Museum of Contemporary Art. 2017. Exhibition Catalogue.[31]

Sources[edit]

  • Harris, Thomas A, and Kambui Olujimi. Through a Lens Darkly: Philosophy of the Artist. , 2014. Internet resource.

References[edit]

Arts
  1. ^Whiting, Sam (7 September 2016). 'Dancing around the art at Clark gallery'. San Francisco Chronicle.
  2. ^Davis, Ben (25 May 2010). 'Summer Guide: Brian Chippendale Paints Up a New Burst of Color Hysteria'. The Village Voice.
  3. ^'Datebook: Kambui Olujimi's 'What Endures' at Catharine Clark Gallery, San Francisco'. Artinfo. 8 September 2016.
  4. ^Pantuso, Phillip (7 November 2014). 'Crossing Brooklyn: Kambui Olujimi, In Your Absence the Skies Are All the Same'. Brooklyn Magazine.
  5. ^'List Projects: Kambui Olujimi'. e-flux. 18 January 2014.
  6. ^'Water as a Cinematic Metaphor for the Tides of Time'. Hyperallergic. 2017-11-17. Retrieved 2019-08-17.
  7. ^ ab'Kambui Olujimi'. CUE Art Foundation. Retrieved 2017-01-02.
  8. ^'Artist Files Grantees Announced! - A Blade of Grass'. A Blade of Grass. 24 January 2013.
  9. ^ ab'New Commissions: Kambui Olujimi, Wayward North'. Art in General. 5 June 2010.
  10. ^Fusco, Coco; Muñoz, José Esteban (2008). 'A Room of One's Own: Women and Power in the New America'. TDR. 52 (1): 136–159. JSTOR25145494.
  11. ^Apel, Dora, ed. (2012). War Culture and the Contest of Images. Rutgers University Press. pp. 79–111. ISBN9780813553955. JSTORj.ctt5hhwpv.8.
  12. ^'Brooklyn Museum'. www.brooklynmuseum.org. Retrieved 2017-01-02.
  13. ^Visitor (2016-12-31). 'Winter in America'. Cleveland Museum of Art. Retrieved 2017-01-04.
  14. ^'Kambui Olujimi Biography Catharine Clark Gallery'. cclarkgallery.com. Retrieved 2017-01-02.
  15. ^'Kambui Olujimi'. arts.columbia.edu. Retrieved 2017-01-04.
  16. ^'Kambui Olujimi The Cooper Union'. cooper.edu. Retrieved 2017-01-02.
  17. ^Harris, Thomas A, and Kambui Olujimi. Through a Lens Darkly: Philosophy of the Artist. 2014. Internet resource.
  18. ^Bautista, Camille (31 October 2014). 'Bed-Stuy Residents Mourn Longtime Community Leader'. DNAinfo New York. Archived from the original on 5 January 2017.
  19. ^'Kambui Olujimi - Fellows - Civitella Ranieri'. exhibit-e. Retrieved 2017-01-02.
  20. ^'Kambui Olujimi - Lower Manhattan Cultural Council'. Lower Manhattan Cultural Council. Retrieved 2017-01-02.
  21. ^'Kambui Olujimi - Artist'. Macdowell Colony. Retrieved 2019-08-17.
  22. ^'Artists Selected for Kehinde Wiley's Inaugural Residency Program in Senegal'. www.artforum.com. Retrieved 2019-08-17.
  23. ^'List Projects: Kambui Olujimi'. MIT List Visual Arts Center. Retrieved 2017-01-02.
  24. ^'Kambui Olujimi: Zulu Time'. Blanton Museum of Art. Retrieved 2019-08-17.
  25. ^Purcell, Barbara; Fri.; March 15; 2019. 'Kambui Olujimi Speaks Art to Power in 'Zulu Time''. www.austinchronicle.com. Retrieved 2019-08-17.
  26. ^'SKYWRITERS & CONSTELLATIONS Newark Museum'. www.newarkmuseum.org. Retrieved 2019-08-17.
  27. ^'Art installation revels in the intersection of art and technology Video'. NJTV News. Retrieved 2019-08-17.
  28. ^'OSL 03: Kambui Olujimi / Public readings from 'Wayward North' and dialogue with Anna Khimasia'. Events Calendar. 2017-11-13. Retrieved 2019-08-17.
  29. ^'Visiting Artist Speaker Series, Fall 2018 ubART Clone'. Retrieved 2019-08-17.
  30. ^'Visiting Lecture Series'. RISD Glass. Retrieved 2019-03-13.
  31. ^Kambui Olujimi : Zulu time. Aranke, Sampada., Volk, Gregory., Kolb, Leah., Madison Museum of Contemporary Art (Madison, Wis.),. Madison. ISBN9780913883389. OCLC981948700.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link) CS1 maint: others (link)

External links[edit]

  • Kambui Olujimi at Museum of Modern Art
  • Kambui Olujimi on IMDb
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